Visual Systems

December 16, 2013 9:08 pm
biocanvas:

The retina of a painted turtle
Birds and some reptiles are known to have the most sophisticated color vision systems of any vertebrate. In the eye, light is focused onto the retina, which contains cone cells responsible for sensing color. In this retina from a painted turtle, cone cells contain oil droplets colored with carotenoids. These droplets act like tiny lenses, filtering specific colors onto cone cells. The amount of carotenoid in each droplet determines if the cone senses red, blue, green, or ultraviolet light.
Image by Dr. Joseph Corbo, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine.

biocanvas:

The retina of a painted turtle

Birds and some reptiles are known to have the most sophisticated color vision systems of any vertebrate. In the eye, light is focused onto the retina, which contains cone cells responsible for sensing color. In this retina from a painted turtle, cone cells contain oil droplets colored with carotenoids. These droplets act like tiny lenses, filtering specific colors onto cone cells. The amount of carotenoid in each droplet determines if the cone senses red, blue, green, or ultraviolet light.

Image by Dr. Joseph Corbo, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine.

February 11, 2013 2:45 pm
neurosciencestuff:


The man whose brain ignores one half of his world
Alan Burgess doesn’t need a rhyme to remember the 5th of November. He’ll never forget the day he had his stroke. It left him with a syndrome known as hemispatial neglect and a strange new perspective.
I asked him how he explains this to other people. “I say it’s two different worlds,” says Burgess. “My old world finished on 5 November 2007 and the new world started the same day.”
His stroke damaged the parietal lobe on the right side of his brain, the part that deals with the higher processing of attention. The damage causes him to ignore people, sounds, and objects on his left.
“Hemispatial neglect typically occurs after a stroke,” says Dr Paresh Malhotra, senior lecturer in neurology at Imperial College London. “It is not blindness in one eye, and it’s not damage to the primary sensory cortex, it’s a process of ignoring, for want of a better word, one side of space.”

Read more
(Image credit: zeably.com)

neurosciencestuff:

The man whose brain ignores one half of his world

Alan Burgess doesn’t need a rhyme to remember the 5th of November. He’ll never forget the day he had his stroke. It left him with a syndrome known as hemispatial neglect and a strange new perspective.

I asked him how he explains this to other people. “I say it’s two different worlds,” says Burgess. “My old world finished on 5 November 2007 and the new world started the same day.”

His stroke damaged the parietal lobe on the right side of his brain, the part that deals with the higher processing of attention. The damage causes him to ignore people, sounds, and objects on his left.

“Hemispatial neglect typically occurs after a stroke,” says Dr Paresh Malhotra, senior lecturer in neurology at Imperial College London. “It is not blindness in one eye, and it’s not damage to the primary sensory cortex, it’s a process of ignoring, for want of a better word, one side of space.”

Read more

(Image credit: zeably.com)

2:35 pm

clembones:

srs google “fundus”

It’s the part of you’re eye that makes you look bad ass in photos, you’re so pretty when you’re faithful to me, science.

February 28, 2012 9:00 am
houseofmind:

Metabolomic Eye by Bryan Williams Jones
This is the photograph that took first place in the 2011 Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge. In the image above, each color represents a different subset of cells that are present in the mouse eye. The winner employed a technique called computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) to map out the different kinds of tissue by probing out the concentrations of common organic molecules, in this case by using antibodies that stained against taurine (red) , glutamine (green) and glutamate (blue).  Thus, the distribution of these molecules results in the colorful and informative image seen above. 
Click on the image to learn about the other photographs and categories. 

houseofmind:

Metabolomic Eye by Bryan Williams Jones

This is the photograph that took first place in the 2011 Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge. In the image above, each color represents a different subset of cells that are present in the mouse eye. The winner employed a technique called computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) to map out the different kinds of tissue by probing out the concentrations of common organic molecules, in this case by using antibodies that stained against taurine (red) , glutamine (green) and glutamate (blue).  Thus, the distribution of these molecules results in the colorful and informative image seen above. 

Click on the image to learn about the other photographs and categories. 

February 12, 2012 3:17 pm
notesonnapkins:

Science as Art: This computational molecular phenotype image of a mouse’s eye reveals the diversity of cell metabolism in the retina. (Image: Ryan William Jones/The University of Utah, Moran Eye Center)More here. 

notesonnapkins:

Science as Art: This computational molecular phenotype image of a mouse’s eye reveals the diversity of cell metabolism in the retina. (Image: Ryan William Jones/The University of Utah, Moran Eye Center)
More here

December 19, 2011 9:54 pm
biocanvas:

A 630-times magnification of cone cells (in red; cells that assist in color perception) captured in the retina of a monkey.
Image by Dr. Nicolás Cuenca, Universidad de Alicante.

biocanvas:

A 630-times magnification of cone cells (in red; cells that assist in color perception) captured in the retina of a monkey.

Image by Dr. Nicolás Cuenca, Universidad de Alicante.

(via biocanvas)

9:53 pm
frittercritter:

All we ever talk about is the retina in my Sensation & Perception psych class and I found an artsier picture of one so yeah it’s getting p0st3d.

frittercritter:

All we ever talk about is the retina in my Sensation & Perception psych class and I found an artsier picture of one so yeah it’s getting p0st3d.

9:53 pm
myheartsoars:

Retina I by Greg Dunn 

myheartsoars:

Retina I by Greg Dunn 

September 17, 2011 10:24 pm
micro-scopic:

Retina, Monkey, Choroid, Pigment Epithelium x20 (MB stain)

micro-scopic:

Retina, Monkey, Choroid, Pigment Epithelium x20 (MB stain)

July 30, 2011 6:13 pm
biocanvas:

Arteries in the eye of a rodent. Image taken with confocal microscopy.
Image by Thomas Deernick, University of California, San Diego.

biocanvas:

Arteries in the eye of a rodent. Image taken with confocal microscopy.

Image by Thomas Deernick, University of California, San Diego.

(via biocanvas)